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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Just looking for some input on which size t-shirt press to get. I have not bought my first press yet and I have never used one.

I have a really hard time imagining needing more than 12x15. If I look at some of my t-shirts with prints on them they practically never exceed that. I also feel like it would just go to the side of the torso or possibly under the belt if you printed larger than that.

On the other hand, 15x15 is such a common size, so I'm wondering if there is some good reason to actually get that size. Am I overlooking something?

In mid-range priced presses you can typically save $200 by going with 12x15. Also, it might be good to not have the extra surface if you don't need it.

Just wanted to see what some of you experienced people think...

Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response!

Do you mean I would need it in case I start pressing other tings than t-shirts? Or do you mean that I'll end up needing to place larger prints on t-shirts?

Just trying to understand why the bigger presses are needed and what they are used for.
 

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For practicality, the press needs to be larger than the art you are pressing. I'd suggest at least an inch extra on every side, so 2 inches larger than your art.

Then depending on the material you are pressing (like Polyester), there can be reasons to use various sorts of pads/pillows/inserts to avoid creating permanent creases in the garment. Part of this strategy can be using a pad that is smaller than the top platen, so the hard 90-degree edge of the metal platen does not bite into the garment.

Point being, even if you never print art over 10", there can be reasons to desire more space on the platen. My press is 16x14 and works for what I do, even combined with pads and so forth as needed. Smaller than that would trickier to work with, which means slower to setup, or maybe not possible to deploy some tricks for best results. A 20x16 would allow even more room for "quick and dirty" setup, and/or more margin for error if working with larger art than my typical 10" width. YMMV
 

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Ya like others mentioned ,you definitely want a press slightly bigger than your max print area so you don't risk uncured prints. DOn't go too big either since you pay in electricity having to heat a bigger surface.
 

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Thanks for the response!

Do you mean I would need it in case I start pressing other tings than t-shirts? Or do you mean that I'll end up needing to place larger prints on t-shirts?

Just trying to understand why the bigger presses are needed and what they are used for.
Always buy:

The largest engine in a car you can afford. Horsepower is a safety feature.
The biggest home you can afford. You will always need more space until you retire.
The largest fishtank you can afford. Avoid MTS (Multiple Tank syndrome)
The largest heat press you can afford. Avoid MPS (Multiple Press Syndrome).
 
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