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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all-

This isn't about pricing, but this is the closest sub-forum that fits, so here goes.

I'm getting ready to order a printer(s), pretreater, etc

My business plan calls for printing custom orders and pre-prints.

The printer I am ordering is based on the Epson P800 and based on test prints takes an average of 3:30 for a white shirt and 5:30 for a dark shirt to print a 10" x 12" full color design.

I'll be using Image Armor inks with a 35 second cure time and I am guessing I will be waiting on the printer, not my press.

Based on the above, would it make more sense to buy two printers, to minimize time wasted waiting on the printer, or do you think one printer would be enough?

Best,

Chris
 

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I don't do dtg, but have a similar issue with sublimation. I find four printers printing transfers feeds two presses nicely, minimising time wasted.

What often makes the job seem longer is the time spent scratching your backside waiting for one print to finish.

If you have the budget and you value your time then I would go for two printers.
The only proviso - and this also applies to sublimation - is will you have enough work to regularly use both printers? if not you could have issues with ink clogging the heads.
 

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Start with one printer to learn and test the waters.
What are you going to do with two printers, if you only have 5 orders to print?

Once you know what you are doing and have things to print, you can buy more printers.
 

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It's way better to buy a pre-treat machine + a epson-based DTG printer. Let me explain why:

1 - You got one to experiment, and see your sales cycle.
1.1 - Pretreat machine saves you time and make your prints more consistent.
2 - If orders are coming in hot - you always buy another one. Or - get financing and buy a proper Epson F2100 DTG. While the "epson-based F800" uses it to print only white shirts.

Why Epson F2100? because - there's after market ink, where you can save on your running cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
PatWibble;4431181If you have the budget and you value your time then I would go for two printers. The only proviso - and this also applies to sublimation - is will you have enough work to [I said:
regularly [/I]use both printers? if not you could have issues with ink clogging the heads.
Initially I won't have enough work for two printers, but the printers are going up in price and the distributor has offered me a good deal for buying two printers now, saving me 20% on the second printer.

My business plan calls for needing that second printer sooner rather than later, so I would have it standing by, waiting for when I need it, although it would probably be prudent to set it up & use it for a bit and then prep it for storage.

Start with one printer to learn and test the waters.
What are you going to do with two printers, if you only have 5 orders to print?

Once you know what you are doing and have things to print, you can buy more printers.
Bob, if I were you, I would build my own printers and save a lot of money. Wish I had your skill set!

It's way better to buy a pre-treat machine + a epson-based DTG printer. Let me explain why:

1 - You got one to experiment, and see your sales cycle.
1.1 - Pretreat machine saves you time and make your prints more consistent.
2 - If orders are coming in hot - you always buy another one. Or - get financing and buy a proper Epson F2100 DTG. While the "epson-based F800" uses it to print only white shirts.

Why Epson F2100? because - there's after market ink, where you can save on your running cost.
I'm buying a pretreatment machine, either way.

As for the Epson F2100, I refuse to buy from a company that is holding a gun to my head.

If, as I have read, parts are not available for the F2100, or the F2000, then after 3 years you are left with a 100+ pound paperweight just waiting to happen.

The P800 prints white & CMYK and does a great job of it according to lots of people, including Bob (above).
 

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Bob, if I were you, I would build my own printers and save a lot of money. Wish I had your skill set!
Well... I actually started with one Epson F2000 myself. Skills are gained through experience.
Just buy one printer for now to learn, and if things go well, you can buy two or even three more.
 

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As for the Epson F2100, I refuse to buy from a company that is holding a gun to my head.

If, as I have read, parts are not available for the F2100, or the F2000, then after 3 years you are left with a 100+ pound paperweight just waiting to happen.
YES x 1000%.

However, that's how the game works - in some senses, you need to outgrow the printer within 3-4 years time (extended warranty) and with financing.

We worked out the sales per month required to keep growing with the printer in 4 years time. One good thing about Epson F2XXX DTG = third party ink. You can stuff other dupont ink - as you wished. it's same precision-core print heads. *wink* *wink*

The min target is the profit from the printing should pay for the printer lease itself. Usually, we sell it off by 3-4 years to cover the remaining of the financing. And, then, we buy new ones - less breakdown, higher throughput.

That's the market that Epson F2000/Brother DTG are designed for.

It really depends on what business model you are going with. I guess this advice is more applicable when you are planing to scale up.

We started off with "epson p-600"-based DTG printers too.
 

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My business plan calls for needing that second printer sooner rather than later, so I would have it standing by, waiting for when I need it, although it would probably be prudent to set it up & use it for a bit and then prep it for storage.

If you are putting one into storage then don't install the inks. You will get clogging issues, and ink has a shelf life.


If you are only working from a business plan I would recomend you start with one cheap printer and if business picks up get a pro quality one. Brother make a printer that is comparible to the Epson, and Ricoh are introducing new models at entry level that might prove to be good.
 
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