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Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

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Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs
Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs
Jack Franklin & Roy Hinkle – Alpha Supply Co
Published by TooGoob
September 12th, 2007
Thumbs up Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

<div>

<p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">As former retailers, we used our first heat press in 1978. Over the decades we used dozens of different types and, as suppliers, continue to use them. Our article is based on that experience.</font></p> <div align=center><font color="black"></font>
<hr size=1 width="50%" align=center>

</div>
<h2><font color="black" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">What you must know-
</font></h2>
<font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Selecting <b>the right heat press</b> for your work <b>is important</b>. However, for many, selecting a heat press can be intimidating. The task will be easier if you keep this one simple thought in mind- <b>All heat presses do the same thing:</b> provide <b>heat</b>, under <b>pressure</b>, for a <b>specified time</b>.</font>

<p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">This article may seem a little long but </font><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">all of your imprinting work revolves around a heat press</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">. The more you know, the better your chances of picking the right one for <b><u>your</u></b> needs.</font></font></p>

<p><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Here are </font><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">three important features</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial"> that you should <b><u>always</u></b> consider:</font></font></p>
<ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Size</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: Think about the size of the <u>work</u> that you want to do and make sure that the press is large enough for want you want to do. There are 5 general groups of sizes and each group has its advantages, depending upon your needs. They are:</font></font></li>
</ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=73 height=100 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image001.jpg" align=right><font size="4" face="Arial">Very Small: 4x6, 6x6 and 6x8 presses are perfect for small items like baby clothes, awkward items like tote bags with seams (they can be opened and pulled onto the press) and even very large items where heat is only needed in a small area. This class is usually referred to as “Label Presses”.</font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=125 height=94 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image002.jpg" align=right><font size="4" face="Arial">Small: 9x12, 11x15 and 12x14 presses are excellent for maximum portability (and very low price), 8½ x 11 heat transfers that you print, patches and other small items. Be aware that many <u>preprinted</u> heat transfers are larger than the heating area on small presses.</font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=144 height=118 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image003.jpg" align=right><font size="4" face="Arial">Medium: 16x16, 15x15 and 14x16 presses are large enough to do the work for most decorators. They offer the advantage of much more power (wattage – important if you are doing a lot of repetitive pressings) than the small presses, a much cheaper price than a comparable 16x20 heat press and the ability to press the typical preprinted heat transfer.</font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=143 height=110 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image004.jpg" align=right><font size="4" face="Arial">Large: Any type of 16x20 heat press is considered to be a “large” heat press and very few have a need for anything larger. This size of press easily does 11x17 transfers that you print on an inkjet printer, the largest preprinted transfers offered on the market, large names and numbers on garments and multiple small items. Salespeople in most companies automatically offer this size because it is a bigger commission for them but you need to carefully consider if you need something this large as a start-up.</font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=100 height=98 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image005.jpg" align=right><font size="4" face="Arial">Very Large: These monsters range in size from 18x20, 14x36 and 20x25, up to a gigantic 40x64. If you think that you need a very large press, speak with a reputable dealer and discuss what you want to do. A smaller press may be more than adequate.</font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul>

<ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Heat Press Type</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: <u>Swing-away</u>, <u>Draw</u> and <u>Clamshell</u> heat presses are the three major types of presses. Each type will have certain advantages (remember, thinking about what <u>you</u> need and want), depending upon how the manufacturer constructs the press.</font></font></li>
</ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=172 height=102 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image006.jpg" align=left hspace=12><font size="4" face="Arial">Swing-away Presses: These presses lift straight up and then the top platen is swung to the right. When doing shirts, most will swing the top platen to a point slightly past the perpendicular (about 100°). Some of the swing-away presses will have a separate “swing-arm” (on the left side of the upper platen) to make platen movement easier (especially on the big 16x20 presses). Sizes of standard swingers range from 9x12 to 16x20, although there are much larger, for specialty needs. </font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul> <p><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</font></p>

<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=100 height=133 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image007.jpg" align=left hspace=12><font size="4" face="Arial">Draw Press: The draw press is unique in its class. The only one that I know of is the 16x20 Hotronix® Draw. This innovative press combines the features that most like in a swinger, with the space saving advantage of a clamshell. The press lifts straight up (2”) like a swing-away. However, instead of swinging to the right, the lower table is pulled out on a precision ball bearing slide. For some, this ability makes it more desirable than even a swing-away.</font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul> <p ><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</font></p>

<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><img width=106 height=134 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image008.jpg" align=left hspace=12><font size="4" face="Arial">Clamshell Presses: The top platens of all clamshell presses just lift straight up, to open all the way. They are offered in 11x15, 15x15, 16x16 and 16x20 sizes. For many, the simple efficiency of this type of press is very desirable. However, upper and lower platen construction can affect your pressings, depending upon your type of work. </font></font></li>
</ul>
</ul> <p ><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</font></p>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<ul type=square>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Rigid Upper &amp; Lower Platens: Clamshells move with a “hinging” movement. If both platens are rigid, the back of the upper platen touches slightly before the front, as you close it. This produces torque (uneven pressure), if the items are very thick. T-shirts, on up to soft mouse pads are fine with this type of press. Items much thicker than that can present a problem.</font></li>
</ul></ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<ul type=square>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Rigid Upper &amp; Tilting Lower Platens: The lower platen <u>tilts</u> up, on this type of press, as the upper platen touches it. This feature minimizes torque on thicker items like heavy jackets and rigid items like license plates and even a few ceramic tiles (the latter two are done with sublimation, not heat transfers).</font></li>
</ul></ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<ul type=square>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Floating Upper Platen &amp; Rigid Lower Platen: This type of clamshell eliminates torque. The upper platen <u>floats</u> free so it is always parallel to the lower platen, as the press closes. This type of clamshell is very useful if your work consists of a variety of thicknesses. </font></li>
</ul></ul>
</ul> <p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">You cannot see, when looking at a picture, what type of platens is on a heat press. You will have to ask or read the manufacturers specs.</font></p>

<ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Safety</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: A cheap, poorly made (or worn out in the case of used) press may be no bargain. Be very cautious about used presses (they never have a warranty) or presses bought overseas (at least make sure that you buy them from a reputable dealer). If everything else is equal, consider a heat press with UL or ETL electrical safety certification. It’s the only way to know for sure.</font></font></li>
</ul> <p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial"><b>Six other features that could be very important to you:</b></font></p>
<ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Weight</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: Will you always be working in a fixed location or will you sometimes be doing mobile retail. If you need mobility, how much weight could you and a friend pick up? Because of manufacturing differences, the <b>same <u>size</u> heat press can vary greatly in weight</b>. Weight has <b><u>nothing</u></b> to do with sturdiness or heating efficiency. The examples are all excellent presses, but:</font></font></li>
</ul><div align=center><table Table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 width="100%"><tr><td width="33%" valign=bottom><p align=center><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman"><img width=144 height=118 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image003.jpg"><br><b><i><font size="4" face="Arial">16x20 Clamshell<br>90 lbs.</font></i></b></font></p>
</td> <td width="33%" valign=bottom>
<p align=center><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman"><img width=143 height=110 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image004.jpg"><br><b><i><font size="4" face="Arial">16x20 Swing-away<br>
108 lbs.</font></i></b></font></p>
</td> <td width="33%" valign=bottom>
<p align=center><font color="black" size="3" face="Times New Roman"><img width=131 height=110 src="https://www.t-shirtforums.com/images/articles/image009.jpg"><br><b><i><font size="4" face="Arial">16x20 Swing-away<br>
185 lbs.</font></i></b></font></p>
</td> </tr></table></div> <ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Form and Function:</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial"> Because of design or accessories, many presses can offer extra advantages (if you need those benefits). In no particular order, here are some <b><u>examples</u></b> (there are more) of what I mean:</font></font></li>
</ul><ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><u><font size="4" face="Arial">Smaller lower platens</font></u><font size="4" face="Arial"> can be purchased for some heat presses (sometimes handy for very small items).</font></font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><u><font size="4" face="Arial">A cap and mug attachment</font></u><font size="4" face="Arial"> can be added to the Knight DC16 heat press, as well as smaller tables. This can be useful (the attachments cost less than a full press) in a fixed location but is not practical for mobile retail and the mug attachment will only print one side of a mug at a time.</font></font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">The same <u>type</u> of press can accept different thickness of items: for example, in the 16x20 size, the Hotronix® Swinger &amp; Draw accepts up to 2”, the HIX Swingman 20D 1½” and the Knight DK20S 1”. If this is important, make sure you find out about the press you want.</font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">All <u>cap presses</u> come with a lower platen(called a form on a cap press). Most have two other sizes of forms available. The Stahls’ Hotronix® and Mighty Press® cap presses have <u>five</u> additional sizes of forms available. This can be very important with the great variety of sizes and shapes in modern caps and visors.</font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">All modern <u>mug presses</u> are full-wrap, with usually negligible coverage differences. However, there are two major differencesin <u>how</u> they heat a mug. One is called a “<u>rising</u>” temperature press and the other a “<u>constant</u>” temperature mug press.</font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<ul type=square>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Rising temperature mug presses idle at a lower temperature and then rise to full temperature when the press is closed. These type presses transfer faster than constant temperature presses.</font></li>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">Constant temperature mug presses stay at the same high temperature at all times. While usually slower, they are best if you will be sublimating ceramic <b>and</b> metal travel mugs (rising temperature presses get too hot, too fast, to use for metal mugs).</font></li>
</ul></ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><u><font size="4" face="Arial">Voltage</font></u><font size="4" face="Arial">: Standard presses are always 110 volts. You usually must specify 220 volts to get that type of press. While there is a little room for discussion, the advantages of a 220v press (minimal) should be weighed against the total ease of plugging 110v presses into any standard wall socket. Note: Never plug a press into the same circuit as your computer.</font></font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">In <u>smaller presses</u>, the power (wattage that powers the heating element) rating can be quite different. This can be important if you will be quickly transferring to many items that draw heat from the platen, as the platen may not have enough time to recover heat, between pressings.</font></li>
</ul></ul>
<ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><u><font size="4" face="Arial">Air Automatic</font></u><font size="4" face="Arial"> heat presses use a compressor, are almost effortless to operate, are most commonly 16x20 in size but can be a clamshell or swing-away in design. They can be ideal when constant high volume pressing is needed. However, this benefit should be carefully considered against the much higher costs (and noise) of an air automatic versus a good manual press.</font></font></li>
</ul></ul><ul type=disc>
<ul type=circle>
<li><font color="black"><u><font size="4" face="Arial">Pressure</font></u><font size="4" face="Arial"> on a manual press is controlled by a knob on the top of the press. Changes in pressure settings are usually needed because of changes in the thickness of the items you are pressing (you raise or lower the top platen). With most manual presses this is done by “feel”. While it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to develop a feel, it can be a nuisance if you have to do it a lot. A few presses offer methods that are more precise. The Stahls’ Hotronix® press line (Auto-open, swinger, draw, cap and label press) uses a patented pressure sensor in the press housing to provide accurate and repeatable pressure setting. The Geo Knight swing-away presses use a height gage to repeat pressure settings and the HIX SwingMan 20D has a height indicator gage on the side of the back support arm.</font></font></li>
</ul></ul> <p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial">There are many other benefits of form and function that may be important to you and it is difficult to learn about them all. The best way to start the process is to visualize exactly what you want to do and then pick the press that best offers those benefits. Remember that a <u>feature</u> is only a <u>benefit</u>, if it helps <u>you</u>, in your work.</font></p>
<ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Easy opening and closing</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: This is important to those who don’t have 100% use of their hands and shoulders and is also often desirable for those who will do a lot of pressings in one day. Presses range from Air Automatics that run on compressors <u>to</u> Auto-Opening manuals that require nothing to open and very minimal strength to close <u>to</u> swingers that are “finger-tip” light to open and close, because of CAM’s or progressive linkage to others that are relatively easy to open and close <u>to</u> others that actually require a bit of muscle to open and close. If this is an important benefit to you, be sure and mention it to your supplier so that they can make sure that the press fits your physical requirements.</font></font></li>
</ul><ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Elevated lower platen</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: Many heat presses have an elevated lower platen. This comes in very handy when you want to pull a shirt over the lower platen, press an image, reverse the shirt and then put an image on the other side. Hotronix® and Mighty Press® Digital presses have this ability, as well, the HIX HT-400D, HT-600D, Presto 20 and the Knight DC16.
<b>Note</b>: for maximum ease of sliding a shirt on (or onto) the lower platen, you should get a Teflon slipcover for the bottom platen your press.</font></font></li>
</ul><ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Digital time and temperature</font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">: Analog [using a dial] timers are often not quite as accurate as digital timers (and many only go up to sixty seconds) and analog temperatures are often read from a tiny gage that is often hard to judge correctly. In the real world, a totally digital press is not essential (i.e., it does not affect the ability of the press) it just makes you more efficient, with less to deal with.</font></font></li>
</ul><ul type=disc>
<li><font color="black"><b><font size="4" face="Arial">Budget, </font></b><font size="4" face="Arial">of course,<b> is always a consideration</b>. While it is not necessary to get the “biggest and the baddest” (if you don’t need it) <b>we do suggest that you get the best that you can afford</b>. While you don’t need an 18-wheeler to go to the grocery store you also don’t want to buy a VW, when you need at least a pickup truck. <b>Give yourself some room to grow</b>.</font></font></li>
</ul> <div align=center><font color="black"></font>
<hr size=1 width="50%" align=center>
</div> <p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial"><b>It may well be that no one heat press (that fits into your budget) has every feature and benefit that you would like to have. In that case, pick what are the most important features that you <u>need</u> and get that press.</b></font></p>
<p><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial"><b>In our supply business we constantly hear the refrain, “well I can’t really afford this press but I don’t want to have to buy another in a year”. We advise folks to take a different perspective.</b></font></p>
<p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial"><b>Only get what you need and can afford. If you work hard, grow and prosper, it will be an affordable joy to buy another heat press.</b></font></p> <p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial"><b>We hope this article has been useful and wish you good health and prosperity.</b></font></p>
<p ><font color="black" size="4" face="Arial"><b>Jack Franklin &amp; Roy Hinkle – Alpha Supply Co.</b></font></p><p ><font color="#000099" size="4" face="Arial"><b><u><a href="http://www.alphasupply.com/">www.alphasupply.com</a>
</u></b></font><font color="#000099" size="4" face="Arial"><b><u><a href="http://www.dyesubinks.com/">www.dyesubinks.com</a></u></b></font></p>
</div>
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Old October 6th, 2007 Oct 6, 2007 8:55:39 AM -   #1 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Who gives clear & concise directions regardingthe processes involved in printing out the digital transfers. I guess I am a bit overwhelmedat all there is to learn. The transfers shouldn't be too difficult provided I have a good heat press.
Look forward to any help at all.
 
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Old October 6th, 2007 Oct 6, 2007 10:35:54 AM -   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

alpha supply has done a good job...but let me say this...there is no safe entry into this biz..regardless of you choices...at some point you will regret one or more of those and have to regroup...I started 7 years ago..and have made several mistakes...some more than once!...so take your best choice on the information at hand and go for it...match your paper to your printer and the correct garment and go for it
skitten likes this.
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Old October 7th, 2007 Oct 7, 2007 9:54:42 PM -   #3 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Wow! We really appreciate this wonderful goldmine of wisdom! I assure you these gifts will not fall on deaf ears.

 
 
Old October 11th, 2007 Oct 11, 2007 11:09:35 AM -   #4 (permalink)
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Smile Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Quote:
Originally Posted by ammoscato
Who gives clear & concise directions regardingthe processes involved in printing out the digital transfers. I guess I am a bit overwhelmedat all there is to learn. The transfers shouldn't be too difficult provided I have a good heat press.
Look forward to any help at all.
We do offer a bit of a tutorial site on the heat transfer business. We cannot post a URL in a message but the discerning eye might get a clue in our signature at the end of the article.
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Old November 3rd, 2007 Nov 3, 2007 4:47:38 PM -   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

extremely helpful!! thanks for posting this!!
 
Old December 11th, 2007 Dec 11, 2007 1:32:09 PM -   #6 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

This Is So Awesome Thanks Alot For This Great Information!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Old December 11th, 2007 Dec 11, 2007 2:29:17 PM -   #7 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Quote:
Originally Posted by young Robb
This Is So Awesome Thanks Alot For This Great Information!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
You are more than welcome. One way or the other (and on differing subjects) we have been teaching almost 40 years.

The basis of almost every successful decision stems from collecting knowledge and understanding choices.

Have a great evening.
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Old December 11th, 2007 Dec 11, 2007 2:31:40 PM -   #8 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBear
You are more than welcome. One way or the other (and on differing subjects) we have been teaching almost 40 years.

The basis of almost every successful decision stems from collecting knowledge and understanding choices.

Have a great evening.
It's people like you that makes this business much easier. Thanks again for the knowledge. I really appreciate it.
 
Old January 20th, 2008 Jan 20, 2008 2:33:45 PM -   #9 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

hello all, I have a 16 x 24 heat press but I need more power to run it. Does anybody the know the process of setting up a generator so that i may run it outside in the garage or something like that. I rent so I can't get a dedicated line. I would like to know what kind of generator would be needed and if anyone has any experience with this. Thanks
 
Old January 21st, 2008 Jan 21, 2008 9:04:14 AM -   #10 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Quote:
Originally Posted by asclark67
hello all, I have a 16 x 24 heat press but I need more power to run it. Does anybody the know the process of setting up a generator so that i may run it outside in the garage or something like that. I rent so I can't get a dedicated line. I would like to know what kind of generator would be needed and if anyone has any experience with this. Thanks
You may want to post this question in the Heat Transfer section of the forum as a new topic. That will make it easier for people to find your question.

Not everyone reads every thread, so if they have the answer to your power question, they may not see it at the end of a thread about "how to choose the right heat press"
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Old February 1st, 2008 Feb 1, 2008 5:45:54 PM -   #11 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Hey,
I'm just starting out. Still not really sure what I need in a press.
I'm wanting to do transfers on t-shirts, and need to be able to do many shirts.
What would be good for a start?

thanks
 
Old February 6th, 2008 Feb 6, 2008 9:17:34 AM -   #12 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Quote:
Originally Posted by cousin eric
Hey,
I'm just starting out. Still not really sure what I need in a press.
I'm wanting to do transfers on t-shirts, and need to be able to do many shirts.
What would be good for a start?

thanks
The above article should help you decide. What exact questions do you have after reading the article?
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Old February 26th, 2008 Feb 26, 2008 6:42:30 AM -   #13 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

Quote:
The above article should help you decide. What exact questions do you have after reading the article?
Well, my question was more concerned with the "brand" of press, at the time I didn't realize that all the brands perform the same task, but it's the style of press (clamshell, swinger,etc.) that performs differently.

Thanks, this is a really great site!
 
Old April 16th, 2008 Apr 16, 2008 4:42:07 AM -   #14 (permalink)
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Default Re: Heat Press Basics - How to Choose the Right Heat Press to Fit Your Needs

HELP!!! I bought a used ball cap press a few years ago and I think it's still collecting dust in my garage.The spring to keep it tight so I get a good tension never worked,and the guy I got it from on E-Bay just blew me off.Is it possible to get it fixed? I am handy as can be but this one baffles me..I spend $250.0 and it is just a "boat anchor" in my opinion.
Thanks in advance
mary
 






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