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Topic Review (Newest First)
August 6th, 2019 04:42 AM
sone12
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

After printed, I let the shirt air dry as long as possible, min 2 hours. Then I heat press them, 170 celsius, in about 20 sec. I always do a washtest, 40 celcius before deliver to customer, works for me.
February 21st, 2019 09:35 PM
youngandrew
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

has anyone tried adding clear discharge base and agent to permaset before?
August 18th, 2016 04:41 PM
NoXid
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Quote:
Originally Posted by Printworksqld
It's not a good idea to add just water to waterbase ink, you will alter the PH value & this can cause curing problems. I've never been a fan of Permaset Opaque ink, it's not a stretch ink so stretching it too far will certainely crack it, the same goes for a standard plastisol. The best waterbase opaque I've used is Manouikan, it's a bit dearer but well worth it as it has more stretch & doesn't dry out in the screen as easily. Waterbase ink can be hard to cure as it can't get past 100deg c until the water is removed, even if pressed at 160deg c, it won't reach that if there's water in the ink, the ink has to be dried thoroughly before heat pressing.
Supercover is absorbed more by the fabric, so the spaces exposed when stretched tend to have ink in them; it does not just sit on top like Plastisol.

Ink needs to be flashed or air dried a bit before heat pressing, just so it isn't wet and makes a mess in your heat press. Then do a two stage cure with the press--so you open the press to vent steam then press again.

You add water when the water has gone missing, and some water goes missing every time you put ink out on a screen. He has good ink now to compare against the glow ink, so has a way to gauge how much moisture it is missing.

That said, there may well be something weird about this glow ink stuff ... I've never tried it. Don't add water to the whole container. Put a bit out in another container to experiment with, as it is easier to add water than to remove it!
August 18th, 2016 04:34 AM
Printworksqld
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

It's not a good idea to add just water to waterbase ink, you will alter the PH value & this can cause curing problems. I've never been a fan of Permaset Opaque ink, it's not a stretch ink so stretching it too far will certainely crack it, the same goes for a standard plastisol. The best waterbase opaque I've used is Manouikan, it's a bit dearer but well worth it as it has more stretch & doesn't dry out in the screen as easily. Waterbase ink can be hard to cure as it can't get past 100deg c until the water is removed, even if pressed at 160deg c, it won't reach that if there's water in the ink, the ink has to be dried thoroughly before heat pressing.
August 17th, 2016 10:55 AM
BasecampDesignCo
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

It's a great product! Wahoooooo for you for figuring it out!! Happy printing!
August 17th, 2016 10:54 AM
katext
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Me again. I made a new test today with permaset supercover mid red (not glow) on a dark blue shirt. I increased the temp to 180C° 5x15s (i think i have tried that temp 3 min and it made a white shirt a little braun.)
It was a success i washed it really ruff by hand, stretced it, no problem at all this time. Cant believe its true. About the glow ink i think nothing but water can be missing so i will try to make it smooth like the red ink i just used and the same temp and time. Thank you all for fantastic support, i would have give up long ago without you.
August 16th, 2016 07:01 PM
BasecampDesignCo
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

I agree that something happened tp your ink, too. It should be fluffy and thick but easily spreadable and easy to stir. It shouldn't be difficult at all to get it out of the container. I've not had issues with supercover (or the regular Permaset Aqua) until this most recent experience with the glow, which I think is more user error on my part than anything else (getting used to a conveyor dryer instead of a heat press to cure). I've had only great experiences with supercover & aqua up to this point. I've had many experiences of Speedball washing out of shirts after a few washes even after being fully cured, but none with Permaset.

Wishing you good luck!
August 16th, 2016 06:33 PM
NoXid
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Quote:
Originally Posted by katext
Today i tested speedball red ink on a grey t-shirt. It worked perfectly. Every fiber in the t-shirt was colored and it is impossible to feel the ink with your hand when touching it. It is impossible to crack the ink by stretchig it. I washed it immediately and it still looked nice. I did same test with a black t-shirt, it didn't cover very good and the red went very dark. I am surprised that there is no ink that easily can color the fibers in the garment no matter what color. Permaset supercover looks very nice until i stretch or wash the t-shirt, and i never put a thick layer of ink because i want the structure from the garment to show. I'm disapointed and out of ideas how to go further whith permaset because before stretch & wash it looks really nice on any color of the shirt. On a t-shirt with minimum stretchability it might work. I tried permaset without "glow" there wasn't a big difference. Do your prints with permaset feel soft or hard?
The red you used was a normal opacity ink. Those only look right on white (or very light colored) shirts, or when printed over the top of a white underbase. Supercover colors are opaque so they do not require an underbase.

From what you said previously, it sounds like it is way too thick. Without any doubt, there is something very wrong with your ink.

Permaset Supercover prints great on American Apparel 2001, Hanes Beefy-T, Bella 1x1 baby rib tank tops! Stretch is not an issue!

Prints feel soft and flexible. That said, opaque waterbased ink does have more feel and body to it than translucent waterbased (normal waterbased). Not as much feel as Plastisol, nor as much of a coat over the surface.

If you are printing on black you have only 3 choices: 1. An opaque white underbase overprinted with regular opacity ink of the desired color; 2. An opaque ink that is the desired color; 3. Discharge ink that eats the dye out of the garment (only works on 100% cotton and certain dyes).

Discharge printing is the only way to print on dark garments and get zero hand feel. All other methods require an opaque ink, and all opaque inks have more hand feel than regular ink.

Your ink froze, is way too dried out, is too old, has gotten too hot, has been growing mold (it happens), or is really alien spooge in a jar Get fresh ink.
August 16th, 2016 01:41 PM
GrayLee
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

I've been using supercover inks for a couple of years with no problems. I flash cure with a hairdryer and then a final cure with a heat press.
I don't use a heat gun due to potentially scorching the t shirt.
Generally I give 3-4 pulls of ink. I then put it under the heat press without clamping it down while I print another T shirt. This allows me an even amount of heat and then I clamp the press down at 180 degrees Celsius for 3 minutes.
The ink itself has to reach 160 degrees Celsius to cure. Use an infrared thermometer to ensure the ink reaches that temperature.
It can be stretched to any extent without it cracking and washes perfectly.
August 16th, 2016 12:09 PM
katext
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Today i tested speedball red ink on a grey t-shirt. It worked perfectly. Every fiber in the t-shirt was colored and it is impossible to feel the ink with your hand when touching it. It is impossible to crack the ink by stretchig it. I washed it immediately and it still looked nice. I did same test with a black t-shirt, it didn't cover very good and the red went very dark. I am surprised that there is no ink that easily can color the fibers in the garment no matter what color. Permaset supercover looks very nice until i stretch or wash the t-shirt, and i never put a thick layer of ink because i want the structure from the garment to show. I'm disapointed and out of ideas how to go further whith permaset because before stretch & wash it looks really nice on any color of the shirt. On a t-shirt with minimum stretchability it might work. I tried permaset without "glow" there wasn't a big difference. Do your prints with permaset feel soft or hard?
August 15th, 2016 10:26 AM
katext
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Thank you for answering. Maybe the ink is old. I bought it in London grafic center on my holiday. The ink is very thick so i have to use a stick or knife to get it out. It's easier to crack the ink horizontally than vertically because the t-shirt is more stretchable that way. I would not dare to sell a t-shirt before i get this right. Next time i will try speedball.
August 14th, 2016 09:03 PM
BasecampDesignCo
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Perhaps it's the glow that's giving you the issues, then. I'm actually doing a job right now with Permaset Supercover Blue Glow and having issues with curing. It seems to be curing well on the Hanes Beefy Ts I printed on, but cracks on womens Comfortsoft tees when doing a stretch test. Only the Glow is doing it, not the other two supercover colors. Interesting. Will let you know what I find...
August 14th, 2016 06:41 PM
NoXid
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Quote:
Originally Posted by katext
... Is there really anyone who is curing the same way as i do (heatgun & heatpress) and get a good result after washing...
As already noted above, yes. I started out with a heat gun for flashing and heatpress for curing. No problems.
I now have a real flash for flashing and the same old heatpress for curing. Still no problems.

"Glow" you mean a glow-in-the-dark additive? Try printing without that. Is the Glow a Permaset product? It could be having an undesired reaction with the ink. And if it is thick, or is a powder itself, it would obviously be making the ink thicker.

Have you ever added water to your ink? Ink dries out a bit every time you use it. So you should add a bit of water and stir it up well after use.

I keep my fresh ink in the original container and keep my "in-use" ink in a separate container. I add fresh ink and water to the in-use container as needed. I always have the ink in the original container as a reference of what good ink looks and feels like.

What screen mesh are you using? If the mesh is too open AND the ink is too thick, you could be laying down way too much ink. A thick, thick layer of ink will NOT cure correctly.
August 12th, 2016 11:33 PM
katext
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Permaset supercover looks like, feels like and behaves like sand filler.
Today i'm going to add some water to the ink. Is this a good idea?
Forgot to mention that i use "glow" if this makes a difference.
August 11th, 2016 08:54 AM
katext
Re: Curing Permaset supercover

Yesterday i looked at the t-shirts after washing them, they all cracked when stretching just a little.
I don't know if it will help to increase the time. Seems impossible to get it right. Is there really anyone who is curing the same way as i do (heatgun & heatpress) and get a good result after washing. Trying to think maybe the ink is to thick. The last time i forced the ink to the fabric trying not to get any surface on top
I wonder if the ink should be elastic so it will stretch or hard and strong
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