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How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

 
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Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 2:17:36 PM -   #31 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by StitchShoppe
I've been misqouted before, but this is not a shirt you are moving between printers, it is a piece of transfer paper. Sometimes it is good to read past the 1st paragraph. I have already double printed transfer paper with no registration problems at all out of my 2/1280's.
Basically I'm just trying to introduce a viable, cost effective alternative that an average joe could use to print white ink without having to get a degree in engineering to rebuild the whole printer.
I'm thinking that all I would need to do is buy a bottle of bulk white, and a second bulk feeder for my second 1280. Basically the only hi-tech stuff I would need to do is read the instructions and were it says fill the black tank with black, fill it with white.
Sorry about that... I actually did read your whole post (and it was arranged so there only was one paragraph :P) ... but for some reason I didn't absorb the part where you said print the white on to TRANSFER paper.


That's actually a really good idea... not exactly DTG, but a very good idea for some of you guys to expierment with. I don't think you would have to do it with 2200's either. I bet you could do it with C88's or something. Just get a CIS unit for the C88 and load it with all white inks (purchased from one of the Epson based DTG makers?... or try contacting other sources of comptable inks and ask them about white).

But yeah... great idea. Depending if it would work or not

Also, on that idea, correct me if I'm wrong but wouldn't you put the white down last?

It might not work well for complex designs, but it could work for simple designs.

Anyway, this idea definitely deserves it's own thread.


Also see my post here with the link to the old school pen-plotter to cutter hack to possibly save some bucks on the cutter.

But I would think that doiing it the way you suggested, you could just cut like you would any normal transfer just using scissors or an exacto?

You're not talking about using opaque transfer paper right? So you would just need to cut it down a like you would for printing on whites.
 
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Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 2:30:19 PM -   #32 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tartorul
I see some problems here:
1. if you want a good quality on the tshirt you must put a lot of ink on the paper but the paper is glossy and the ink will be mixed randomly before dry.

2. ink must be capable to be transfered onto the tshirt by heating or another method. In this moment only heating is available.

This things are already done by the sublimation ink, but dye sublimation work only on white/light tshirt, 100% polyester or 50/50.

The digital transfer paper I've seen (Epson, Techniprint, and something else I forget) has had more of a MATTE finish if anything. I wouldn't consider it glossy at all.

I think that for this process being discussed (printing white to transfer paper) a manufacture who makes pigment based inks compatible with the printer could probably produce a similar ink in white as well. Just ask them and see what they say.



.........Is it possible that Rodney can split the messages regarding the DIY white-transfer printing discussion to it's own thread? It's a great idea to play with, but a little off topic (but I definitely want to talk more about it!)
 
Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 2:32:26 PM -   #33 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by StitchShoppe
The $200 dollar question is will it clog the 1280 nozzel. The $??? question is where to get a bulk bottle of white.
Thanks Tartorul, you Romanian guys are pretty knowledeable

Just make it a $79 dollar question and do some tests with a C88
 
 
Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 2:37:31 PM -   #34 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DTG Printing
As for how many washes before fading, well that's the real question. When printing on the Flexi-Jet, I can say the inks used are incredible. On the washability scale anything over a 4 is acceptable. The Flexi-Jet inks rate at a 4.8, that's a good rating, as a matter of fact, that's a great rating. It's too soon for me to say at this point whether the white is as good, since it's newly released and I have no longer been involved in the Flexi-Jet. I still find out as much as I can and when I know, I can share it.
Just curious what is the basis for this scale? Does traditionally screenprinted = 10?

Great to hear about the new ink on the horizon
 
Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 2:53:19 PM -   #35 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atari
Just curious what is the basis for this scale? Does traditionally screenprinted = 10?

Great to hear about the new ink on the horizon
There is actually a scale for this and 5 is the highest. After washing the first print on a Flexi-Jet with a 4.8 rating it looks just like a screenprinted shirt run on an auto press. The fibers of the shirt come through, but the ink remains steadfast in color. Wash after wash, the color remains.

In this kind of printing, I don't think you will have a better rating than a 4.8, because of the shirt fibers, I really don't think it's possible.
 
Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 3:09:03 PM -   #36 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Sorry I spoke too soon about the idea of printing white to transfers....

I still think you would have a big problem with the registration when you put it between 2 machines, or simply reprinting it in the same machine.

Try it right now on your printer.

Print out a paragraph of text, and then put that paper back in the printer and print again.
 
Old July 14th, 2006 Jul 14, 2006 3:10:58 PM -   #37 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DTG Printing
There is actually a scale for this and 5 is the highest. After washing the first print on a Flexi-Jet with a 4.8 rating it looks just like a screenprinted shirt run on an auto press. The fibers of the shirt come through, but the ink remains steadfast in color. Wash after wash, the color remains.

In this kind of printing, I don't think you will have a better rating than a 4.8, because of the shirt fibers, I really don't think it's possible.

Nice. I think If I was in the market and wanted to BUY a DTG printer, I would give that flexi a hard look. Lots of great innovation there. And that nail printer thing they have is crazy Much respect to those guys.
 
Old July 17th, 2006 Jul 17, 2006 8:45:34 AM -   #38 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Thanks everyone for all your help in getting the answers I was after. From what I've learned here this type of printing should really be called DTPGCIHP.
Direct To Pretreated Garment Cure In Heat Press. It kind of takes the wind out of the "sales" pitch, You don't wast any time printing transfers. Again Thanks for everyones input.
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Old July 17th, 2006 Jul 17, 2006 9:41:22 AM -   #39 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Pretreat only dark garments, and yes you have to cure in a heat press or a belt dryer. You have to cure the inks no matter what method you are using and these surpass transfer quality.

You can press while the printer is printing and you can save a ton of time doing this. It can be much faster than it sounds. Darks are always an issue, but you end up with a better product than transfers no matter what way you look at it.
 
Old July 17th, 2006 Jul 17, 2006 11:25:05 PM -   #40 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DTG Printing
You have to cure the inks no matter what method you are using and these surpass transfer quality.
digitial inkjet, custom plastisol, or both?

I would think that custom plastisol transfers would be better than (current) DTG technology.

"Better" for washfastness anyway?
 
Old November 3rd, 2006 Nov 3, 2006 9:19:16 PM -   #41 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Is anyone still toying with this idea?
 
Old November 14th, 2006 Nov 14, 2006 5:05:42 PM -   #42 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

using a heat press to do adhere a heat transfer is a type of curing process,
dont u think?

nobody would have a sellable printed product without a type of heat curing process. no matter if ur doing screenprinting, heat pressing, or digital printing, all methods must be set with either a ur using an conveyer oven, an industrial hand dryer, or heat press doesnt matter.
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Old November 14th, 2006 Nov 14, 2006 5:32:05 PM -   #43 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atari
digitial inkjet, custom plastisol, or both?

I would think that custom plastisol transfers would be better than (current) DTG technology.

"Better" for washfastness anyway?

the quality of a dtg's washfastness depends on alot of factors.

its not just from the chemistry of ink alone. it has to do with what types off dyes and finishes are used on the shirt, and alot of it has to do of the quality of the FABRIC ur printing on... if u were to digitally print onto crummy fabric that massively pills after one wash, then obviously ur going to get a crummy looking print. but its not the printers fault. the pilling of the shirt breaks up the print making it appear super fuzzy or like it bled.

how do i know?
heres what i experienced.
we do dtg printing for private labels and we give them the option of using their preferred blanks or our blanks. she had bought american appparel shirts for us to print on. we printed on them, she picked them up and exclaimned how beautiful they looked. took them to a garment dye house to get them siliconed.
the next day we get a call saying that all 200 garments were ruined because the print bled. when she showed me the shirts the next week, i was startled bkuz in fact they did bleed, the white shirts were a light gray because the majority of the print used black ink.

we had never had a problem like this occur since we've begain using this machine. it was odd that it did that now but not before... thats why i didnt believe it was our printing that was the problem but i waas concered because WHAT IF she was right, we cant go on using this machine if its truue.

therefore, i conducted this test. i printed the same print onto 4 brand new tshirts. (two shirts were her american apparel blanks. the other two were our custome made blanks. ) after printing and proper heat curing. i took 1 AA shirt and 1 of ours to our dyehouse and she took the the other two shirts to the dyehouse she normally goes to for siliconing.

the end result?
the two shirts she took to her dye house were completely ruined because the silicone that her garment dyer was using had pulled alot of the color off the shirt

the two shirts we took to our dye house did not bleed. the silicone they used actually holds color in the shirt rather then pulling it out. but there was a difference in pilling from the two shirts. the aa shirt pilled all over, fading the colors slightly and making the print look out of focus & fuzzy. our blank had very very little pilling no fading. the print still looked in focus.


what did we learn from all this? that not all silicones are the same and that all fabric are not the same, even with the same cotton percentage.
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Old November 14th, 2006 Nov 14, 2006 8:32:05 PM -   #44 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

I am interested as to what type of fabric you use, also I have a basic knowledge of garment dying and I am not familiar with silicone dying, if it is not too much trouble could you explain what that is, thanks.
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Old March 11th, 2007 Mar 11, 2007 9:16:19 PM -   #45 (permalink)
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Default Re: How-To hack a EPSON 2200 into a DTG Direct-To-Garment printer?

I have had some free time lately and have managed to modify a epson c62 to print on a shirt, the only problem is perfecting some type of feeding mechanism. I never intended on this thing to actually work anyway. But this does prove that it can be done, by someone smarter than myself perhaps. Anyways, was just wondering if anyone else has been tinkering lately. However this does explain why DTG does cost so much. Allot of R and D went into these products, much less getting them to print white! But I just wanted to see if anyone else has been playing with this idea. Until then I am saving for a DTG or Gt-451 and continuing to print the "old fashioned way"....Screenprinting.


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