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Discuss the various aspects of direct to garment printing. DTG printers include Brother, T-Jet, Flexi-Jet, DTG Kiosk, Kornit, Mimaki, Tex-Jet and others! Discuss and learn about this up and coming printing technology.



Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

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Old September 17th, 2011 Sep 17, 2011 6:25:49 AM -   #76 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Hi, I'm totally new to this and was pretty set on purchasing the Anajet mp5. I think i'll do a little more homework now thanks so much for the info.
 
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Old September 17th, 2011 Sep 17, 2011 6:49:39 AM -   #77 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

I'm starting to feel a bit scared after reading all this. So if not DTG then what? I want to be able to take custom orders but i want to be able to design my own for retail sale. AHHH Help!!
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Old November 24th, 2011 Nov 24, 2011 8:04:47 AM -   #78 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Quote:
Originally Posted by binki
DTG printing is the most exciting thing to happen to the garment industry since automatic screen machines and dyesub. There are, however, things you need to know.

1) the ink has a shelf life. the longer it sits around the bigger the chance you will have bad ink.

2) production times are nowhere near screen printing. while you can print short runs profitably, longer runs need much better control of costs to be competitive.

3) printing a single shirt can take 4 minutes or more from start to finish.

3) this is a complicated piece of equipment with close tolerances. not paying attention to that fact will yield nothing but frustration.

4) these machines like to run. the more you run it the happier it will be. the less you run it or the longer it just sits around the more chance you will have for problems like head clogs.

5) the ink is expensive.

6) pressing the shirts after printing adds to the time to print, consider a tunnel dryer like screen printers use.

7) color matching is a big issue. make sure you understand how colors work on a pc, how that are translated in the rip, and how your machine treats them.

8) unlike screen printing or embroidery, bitmaps (raster images) are your friend. imo this is one huge advantage over other forms of decorating.

did i miss anything
over 3 years since i wrote this, here is an update.

a) pretreat all garments, light and dark.

b) learn how the machine works and how to replace every part that can go bad.

c) never work on the machine while it is plugged in (fried motherboard)

d) clean the machine often. it will run better. this includes the encoder strip and wheel, capping station, wiper assembly, ink delivery system and any place else dust will accumulate

e) keep enough spare parts, 2 of everything that costs under $100 and maybe one of other critical elements. this includes encoder strip, ribbon cables, printhead carriage, print head and capping station/wiper assembly.

f) when your machine won't print don't assume it is the print head. the capping station may be dirty or not seating the print head or your lines may be a little clogged. learn how to clean the capping station or just replace it. learn how to flush your lines with cleaning solution.

g) know your costs so you can price affectively.

h) offer different products such as portraits that can command a higher price.

i) get intimate with your rip software and understand how it works and what each option is for. contact the developer company if you have to (if your vendor doesn't know or won't tell)

j) do your homework, make sure you go to the vendor and bring some artwork with you to see the entire process before you buy. you need to know all the steps and see it in action as you would have to do with someone just walking in with a picture and wanting it printed on a shirt.

good luck and enjoy your printing!
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Old November 24th, 2011 Nov 24, 2011 11:32:59 AM -   #79 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

On the money. Yes, pretreat them all. Yes figure out tunnel conveyors. Yes buy spares. Yes become intimate with the machine. Our staff has learned to say hello to it in the morning, and offer it lunch. Then make sure it's happy at 5pm.
 
Old November 24th, 2011 Nov 24, 2011 11:38:34 AM -   #80 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Happy Turkey Day. Good advice right on target. Thanks for the post.
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Old December 27th, 2011 Dec 27, 2011 10:44:23 PM -   #81 (permalink)
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Thumbs up Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Quote:
Originally Posted by cavedave
I would like to add,

Research the dealer / manufacture you buy the machine from, these machines are all high maintance compared with most other inkjets and good support from the manufacture / dealer can be worth a fortune and defintly worth paying a little extra for in the long run.
Check the details of the warrenty (on site vs return to manufacture) (3 months vs 12 months) and what extended warrently will cost once the initial warrenty expires.

I never buy warrenty on desktop printers or PC's, but if I was buying a DTG machine I would certainly want it.

Best regards

-David
Thank you David and everyone in here for this vital info. The warranty on these DTG machines had me questioning.
 
Old January 17th, 2012 Jan 17, 2012 10:53:49 PM -   #82 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

but how do you find the wash and wear? I got 4 or 5 samples (white and black shirts) from different dealers (different makes) of dtg printers, and they were all terrible. Showed serious signs of wear or fade after 5 or 6 washes.(washed in cold, inside out) Especially the white shirts. Whats up with that? They claim 60-80 washes on their websites. I was all ready to buy one, but now.. Im not sure. Repeat business was gonna be a big part of mine, and with poor results like that, I wont get it.
 
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Old August 13th, 2012 Aug 13, 2012 12:18:45 PM -   #83 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Quote:
Originally Posted by abmcdan
You should also get some training in basic artwork stuff. Adobe Photoshop is a good software that will be compatible with most any files you will receive. There are people here that also use Corel.

Things you should know about artwork (Off the top of my head, chime in if I'm incorrect or left something out):

1.) DPI - Most importantly know that graphics off of the internet are usually 72 dpi and typically you need a 150 dpi image or better for the highest print quality. Just because it looks nice on screen doesn't mean it will print nice. Garbage In = Garbage Out

2.) Know the difference between the common file types: .jpg, .gif, .psd, .png, .eps

3.) Basic image manipulation: Since what is shown on screen might be different than the printed image you may need to change the image to get the correct output. Lighten and Darken, etc..

Andy
Hey, I'm new here. Just started reading through this great thread.

Taking a quick break to correct this statement cause my 15 years of experience and training in digital imaging is making me unable to let this go...haha.

1) DPI/PPI refers to image resolution. It tells a person/machine that for every inch there are X amount of dots/pixels.

In order to determine what the resolution is you MUST have the dimensions in inches (or some other measurement of length).

Saying xDPI or xPPI without those dimensions is meaningless.

You determine the actual image resolution by multiplying the DPI/PPI by the number of inches in each dimension.

Watch:
I need to print my graphic on a shirt. I want it to be 8x10 inches. It is a photo realistic image and I know I need to have at least 300ppi in order for it to look sharp (not blurry). How many pixels do I need to print this correctly?

8 inches x 300ppi = 2400pixels
10 inches x 300ppi = 3000 pixels

My graphic must be 2400x3000pixels

Also, when you look at an image on the computer screen you are not looking at images that are 72dpi.

Not every monitor is set at the same resolution. Not every monitor is the same dimensions physically.

While some monitors may be smaller physically they have more tiny pixels/dots packed into them (new retina screens by Apple for example).

My 22 inch NEC monitor has a resolution of 1,920×1,080 pixels. My 15 inch MacBook Pro has a resolution of 1440x900.

If I look at the same image on both my monitors the image will not be the same size physically across the screen in inches. This is because there are different numbers of pixels on each monitor and different physical dimensions for those pixels to fit into.

Therefore, the image can not be 72dpi just because you are looking at in on a computer monitor. If that were the case, the image would never change physical size when viewed on different monitors. Remember, DPI/PPI must have dimensions in inches attached to it or it is meaningless.

What you are looking at on a computer monitor can only be accurately described in its actual pixel resolution. Ex: 500x400 pixels.

PPI/DPI really only comes into play when you are outputting the image. Mainly into print. This is because you have a controlled medium to output to.

Computer monitors used by typical consumers is not a controlled medium. It's all over the place. Just ask web designers about what they deal with to optimize the sites they create for users with no set resolution, OS, browser, or anything else standardized.

**Bonus asshole comment** Everything we deal with in the computer is pixel based. Nothing in this digital realm is a dot. So, DPI is the wrong term to use. It's still used because of old print types having a hard time understanding and adopting pixels into their vocabulary. It's fine to use it as long as you know the difference. Everything we output from our printers are dots though. DPI means something here. We're printing dots, not pixels. That said, it's very important to know the difference between the two and how they work. You can print an image at 8x10 at 300PPI AND at 1440DPI. The image resolution in pixels tells the printer how many inches it is and how many "pixels" to replicate per inch...it is also telling the printer how many dots to lay down in that inch as it replicates those pixels in the form of dots. That's probably super effing confusing to first think about. But, you'll hopefully understand this already if you've been printing for a while and if you're new, you will understand as you print more and can see the settings and how printing works.

2) Good advice

3) This is referring to color management. If you want some insight on what color management is and how it works, this is a fantastic read:
http://www.xrite.com/documents/liter...e_to_cm_en.pdf

It helps you understand how devices talk to each other about color. Once you start to understand that, it gets lot easier to know WHY you are making certain adjustments and how you can better control your output.

Ok, back to reading through this thread.
 
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Old September 18th, 2012 Sep 18, 2012 4:59:49 PM -   #84 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Paul Green just published a vendor-agnostic article in Printwear's 2012 D2 Report that attempts to capture the top 5 most important things you should do before you invest in direct to garment.

It's business-oriented and repeats and reinforces much of what has been said here. Before the expert technicians on this thread snicker in derision , the intent is to set realistic expectations for someone who is outside this industry, a noob. If you're already a DTG magician there's nothing new here for you.

I’ll summarize the highlights:
  1. Have a marketing plan. Never assume that customers are going to line up for your company or that the business will grow organically. The better developed your marketing database and growth plans, the faster you will grow it.
  2. (Attend or) complete product training. Too many DTG owners enter the industry with not a lick of hands-on training. Or they fail to leverage tools. Spending a little time and/or money on learning will pay off big time.
  3. Create a dedicated shop environment. You wouldn’t bring a newborn baby home and THEN start to set up a nursery, right?
  4. Invest in graphics training. You are going to be a graphics production department, by proxy. Learn the software that you will use to optimize customer graphics NOW.
  5. Establish a learning curve. Last but not least, don’t schedule orders for fulfillment the day you get the printer.
The supplement also has a few other great articles by other industry experts.

One of our field techs also recommended that we mention a few other critical bits of knowledge:
  • Use 100% cotton rather than 50/50 blends – it’s water based ink
  • The weight of the shirt – 6 oz, 5.5 oz, 5 oz, etc. – and the weave – ringspun, slub knit, etc. – will all have a significant effect on pre-treatment volume and ink adhesion – so test and practice with every variety of shirt you sell
  • Along the lines of software learning: This is vital because your customer’s graphics will sometimes look great on a screen but often be terrible for printing purposes. Too many DTG owners blame the printer when they have not prepped a source graphic first. You will often need to convert graphics to RGB values. If you don’t, you will see a difference in quality. The goal is to achieve the best possible image fidelity.
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Old January 9th, 2013 Jan 9, 2013 11:42:49 PM -   #85 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

It’s quite frustrating to hear that in spite of controlling the environment (20 to 27C, >50% Humidity), limiting the dust, and running a dark shirt print (at least) every but day still DTG has to face clogging issues? I never had one yet but I thought these kind of things if consistently done will avoid you to be in trouble with the DTG.

I have my concern as well, what do you think about the machines made out of outsourced Epson Print head? Chinese made DTG’s are also using Epson printhead. Are they all the same considering that they brandish the same print heads? What will happen to these DTGs if suddenly Epson stops manufacturing your type of printhead, such could put one in a predicament of not finding one to replace his printhead? That worries me as I don’t like my 20k (6k in Chinese made J) machine idle in the corner and collect dust.

It has been mentioned in this thread also that the printhead is considered consumables? If that is the case is it predictable? Under a careful run would a certain printhead last only for an X amount of prints?

I am actually researching and planning to buy DTG Kiosk.
 
Old January 10th, 2013 Jan 10, 2013 1:53:27 PM -   #86 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Quote:
Originally Posted by humvee908
It’s quite frustrating to hear that in spite of controlling the environment (20 to 27C, >50% Humidity), limiting the dust, and running a dark shirt print (at least) every but day still DTG has to face clogging issues? I never had one yet but I thought these kind of things if consistently done will avoid you to be in trouble with the DTG.

I have my concern as well, what do you think about the machines made out of outsourced Epson Print head? Chinese made DTG’s are also using Epson printhead. Are they all the same considering that they brandish the same print heads? What will happen to these DTGs if suddenly Epson stops manufacturing your type of printhead, such could put one in a predicament of not finding one to replace his printhead? That worries me as I don’t like my 20k (6k in Chinese made J) machine idle in the corner and collect dust.

It has been mentioned in this thread also that the printhead is considered consumables? If that is the case is it predictable? Under a careful run would a certain printhead last only for an X amount of prints?

I am actually researching and planning to buy DTG Kiosk.
No, you're right - if you have a good quality machine, running a dark shirt every day should mitigate clogging in that environment. Digital apparel printing technology has come a LONG way in the past 7 years, and ink recirculation, a relatively airtight delivery system, combined with good humidity, good maintenance and daily use is sufficient to preserve the print head(s). An occasional white line flush doesn't hurt either.

Stainless steel heads can last indefinitely with proper care and use.
As far as clogging, it mostly depends on just one thing: are you leaving white ink in the lines without using it for several days in a row? This is a common user error. We train against it, we blog and publish articles warning against it, but people still do it.

TSF owners of d-t-g printers - including competitors - know what I am talking about: an owner who refuses to understand the machine, puts ink in and walks away. Vendors should take their licks from customers if their equipment fails, but it goes both ways.

I own a pre-SPRINT FP-125 now - 1900 head on an 1800 chassis - and I only load white ink when I have a batch of dark shirts to print. Otherwise I flush and leave those channels idle with cleaning fluid. I leave CMYK and auto-maintenance running in a 45 RH environment. Sometimes I go a week without running a print, just a nozzle check. I factory-refurbished it after buying from a 3rd party. I have never had a clog. Not a product plug, just a fact.

As far as the supply of print heads, this is where having a company with demonstrated engineering savvy is key. You can go with purely vertical companies who make their nut on consumables. Expect to pay through the nose for their inks and supplies. Or you can go with a company that outsources some components, assuming they have covered their bases and have sufficient backing to retroactively engineer improvements.

In either case, if your key worry is the idea of repairing or replacing a couple thousand bucks worth of equipment once every year or two, you might want to take another look at your business plan.

No matter what technology you choose, there will be a "getting familiar" curve of weeks or possibly months -- and definitely consumption of equipment and supplies -- that doesn't directly drive profit. This is to be expected and planned for. The same is true of screen printing, embroidery, dye-sub and other technologies.
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Old January 10th, 2013 Jan 10, 2013 2:19:29 PM -   #87 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Print heads for the Kiosk 1/2 are no longer produced a few are around but on the last few. Prices will sky rocket!!!
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Old January 11th, 2013 Jan 11, 2013 9:25:20 PM -   #88 (permalink)
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Default Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Thanks Joe for the information,

@ Spider, what would you think owners of Kiosk 1&2 will do if thier heads suddenly runs out of stock now? Is the manafacturer (DTG) mitigated this already?
 
Old January 18th, 2013 Jan 18, 2013 5:54:06 AM -   #89 (permalink)
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Default Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Awesome information! I bought my DTG printer (T-Jet 2) about 5 months ago and I can tell you that frustration is part of me now. While reading all this, I see light at the end of the tunnel. Many things that have been going wrong have been caused by my ignorance.

Sure it is harder than they said, way harder, but it sure can be fun. Pre-treat and t-shirt quality are key to a better looking garment. So mastering pre-treatment is going to take a while, but is critical. And don't try to save a lot buying cheap tees...go with good quality cotton.

Thanks for the info and time, it's been really helpful!
 
Old June 12th, 2013 Jun 12, 2013 5:04:20 PM -   #90 (permalink)
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Question Re: Before you get into DTG, things you need to know

Thank you everyone for all the great info, I've learned so much from this thread.

I do have one question which was never really addressed. Everyone's advice has to do with what to know from the printing side of things - what about when the shirt lands in the customers hands? To point:

I have read that the biggest drawback for DTG printed shirts is that they fade very quickly, faster when washed frequently and in warm/hot water. Is this still true, or have advancements been made in the technology that this is not an issue?

I want to offer my customers quality that will not fade overtime. After all, why return to my store and buy my shirts if they don't hold up? Thanks in advance to anyone that can shed some light on this.

Edit: Just to be clear, I have been reading around the forums and this is definitely an issue, often dealt with by finding the right curing time and what not. Still, those posts are all from several years ago and I am curious if there have been significant improvements. Thanks

Last edited by sandb; June 12th, 2013 at 05:56 PM.. Reason: Update
 






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